Inner Corner at Base of Wall Gloversville NY

The concrete masonry can be connected to the corner column with a debonded shear anchor. This type of anchor resists out-of-plane (but not in-plane) shear forces and permits movement between the steel column and concrete masonry.

Local Companies

Insogna Timothy Full Masonary Service
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Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: September 1, 2006

By Walter A. Laska

It is difficult for a mason to properly tool mortar joints at inner wall corners due to the size and shape of the jointer and the acute angle formed by the intersecting brick. As a result, the mortar joints at this location cannot be tooled neatly or compactly. Therefore, inner wall corners provide an ideal location for expansion joints.

Expansion joints located at inner corners are easy to construct and are well concealed. The expansion joint should be totally void of any material which might inhibit movement, and the reinforcement must be discontinuous at the expansion joint.

The concrete masonry can be connected to the corner column with a debonded shear anchor. This type of anchor resists out-of-plane (but not in-plane) shear forces and permits movement between the steel column and concrete masonry. Also, the connection creates a control joint in the concrete masonry backing along the column interface.
Elevation View

The space between the column and the concrete masonry should be kept free of all mortar bridging. If the column and concrete masonry are tightly bonded, any movement of the column is transferred to the masonry, possibly causing the concrete masonry backing to crack.

Flashing continuity must be maintained at the inner corners. The flashing should be cut, lapped, and set in a continuous bed of mastic to prevent water from flowing under the laps.

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