How Masonry Buildings Resist Earthquakes Yorktown Heights NY

Because masonry buildings usually have many structural wall elements, they tend to be stiff laterally. Because masonry buildings in Yorktown Heights are stiff laterally, even moderate earthquakes can subject them to large shear loads at their base.

Local Companies

Long Hill Masonry Corp
(631) 874-9701

Manorville, NY
Mark Anthony Mason Concrete & Brick Specialist
(516) 256-0800
922 Downing Rd
Valley Stream, NY
Concrete Creations
(914) 771-4054

Tuckahoe, NY
Kjm Construction of Albany
(518) 862-2085

Albany, NY
W R A Construction
(845) 586-3961
2884 E Hubbell Hill Rd
Margaretville, NY
Nick Larizza Masonry Inc
(914) 242-0693
53 Kisco Park Dr
Mount Kisco, NY
Hylkema Masonry
(716) 741-4213
9315 Greiner Rd
Clarence, NY
R & J Brick Masonry Inc
(516) 764-7668
55 Front St
Rockville Centre, NY
Ace Concrete Co
(631) 728-5419
276 W Montauk Hwy
Hampton Bays, NY
Mangone Mason Contractors
(516) 997-0927
251 Post Ave
Westbury, NY

Provided By:

Source: Masonry Construction
Publication date: January 1, 1990

By Richard E. Klingner

How vulnerable are masonry buildings to earthquakes? How can they be designed to resist earthquakes?

HOW MASONRY BUILDINGS RESPOND

Because masonry buildings usually have many structural wall elements, they tend to be stiff laterally. Because masonry buildings are stiff laterally, even moderate earthquakes can subject them to large shear loads at their base.

For a typical masonry building, these shear loads can be calculated in the following way: Base shear load= (building mass) x (earthquake ground acceleration) x (dynamic amplification factor).

MASONRY SEISMIC DESIGN

Though even moderate ground accelerations can subject masonry buildings to large shear loads, masonry buildings can still be designed to resist these loads. In general, the designer must estimate the lateral inertial forces acting on each element and provide for the transfer of these forces down to the foundation.

INELASTIC RESPONSE OF MASONRY BUILDINGS

A masonry building's earthquake resistance has been described here as a function of wall layout, wall area, and wall strength. These characteristics are often sufficient. Enough wall area can often be provided so that even during a strong earthquake the building's walls remain basically elastic, without any yielding of reinforcement. However, architectural constraints may limit the wall area that can be provided.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction