High School Sport Injuries Massapequa Park NY

Nearly 15 percent of all high school sports injuries are bad enough to keep a child from playing for at least three weeks, with football leading the pack in severe injuries, a new U.S. study finds. The review of two years of injury data also found that girls experienced a greater rate of severe injury than boys in comparable sports they both play, such as basketball, soccer and baseball/softball.

Local Companies

J Moshirpur
(718) 334-4000
7901 Broadway # D3-6
Flushing, NY
Maria Diaz-Monero
(718) 457-3291
4036 Junction Blvd
Flushing, NY
Barry Kuttner
(516) 432-0011
604 E Park Avenue
Long Beach, NY
Rafael Arias
(718) 651-3355
5118 Codwise Pl
Flushing, NY
Noch D'silva
(631) 669-1171
1175 Montauk Highway Suite 4
West Islip, NY
Fred Benjamin
(516) 327-0850
3003 New Hyde Park Road Suite 201
New Hyde Park, NY
Nancy Shevell
(718) 445-2298
16303 Oak Ave
Flushing, NY
Fred Suser
(516) 596-1200
37 Stewart St
Hewlett, NY
Cooper Robert
(516) 766-3730
77 N Centre Ave # 306
Rockville Centre, NY
Bushan L Khashu
(516) 364-5400
175 Jericho Tpke # 200
Syosset, NY
Data Provided by:
  

Provided By:

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 15 percent of all high school sports injuries are bad enough to keep a child from playing for at least three weeks, with football leading the pack in severe injuries, a new U.S. study finds.

The review of two years of injury data also found that girls experienced a greater rate of severe injury than boys in comparable sports they both play, such as basketball, soccer and baseball/softball.

Wrestling, girls' basketball and girls' soccer followed football in having the highest severe injury rate, according to the study in the September issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

"Other studies have shown injury rates by sport, however, very few studies have highlighted the severity of injuries per sport. Our research illustrated severe injuries occurring most frequently in football," study author Dawn Comstock, an assistant professor at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, said in a news release issued by the journal's publisher.

The researchers examined injuries reported at 100 nationally representative high schools from 2005 to 2007 in nine sports: boys' baseball and girls' softball; boys' and girls' basketball; boys' football; boys' and girls' soccer; girls' volleyball; and boys' wrestling.

The study found that severe injuries most frequently occurred to a player's knee (30 percent), followed by the ankle (12.3 percent) and shoulder (10.9 percent). Illegal actions by a player, such as tripping or spear tackling, resulted in 5 percent of the severe injuries.

"Preventing these types of severe injuries is especially important to minimize health-care costs both on the family and on the health-care system itself," said Comstock, who added that future studies should look at minimizing these risks.

According to information issued by the AOSSM, U.S. children experience an estimated 2 million sports-related injuries annually that result in 30,000 hospitalizations.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about preventing sports injuries.

SOURCE: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, news release, Sept. 1, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com