Hidden Decking Fasteners Central Islip NY

Who came up with the first hidden decking fastener is open to debate. Weston Leavens remembers first seeing them in a magazine sometime around the end of the Reagan administration.

Local Companies

Kuhn Construction, Inc
417 Main St
Islip, NY
Center Island Landscaping Limited
(631)423-4413
444 Coolidge Drive
Centerport, NY
T N T Lawn Services
(516)249-0669
47 Intervale Avenue
Farmingdale, NY
High Ridge Construction Landscape Design Inc
(631)585-0937
87 Eklund Boulevard
Nesconset, NY
Glenn Graham
Graham Associates

631-665-9619
1981 Union Boulevard
Bay Shore, NY
Alure Home Improvements
1999 Hempstead Turnpike
East Meadow, NY
Legacy Builders and Remodelers
1363-8 Lincoln Ave
Holbrook, NY
Suburban Landscape Inc
(631)262-0202
75 Larkfield Road
East Northport, NY
Dun-Rite Lawn Sprinklers
(631)758-4900
1 Voyages Court
Holtsville, NY
Par-Lawn Inc
(516)731-8853
3654 Howard Lane
Wantagh, NY
Data Provided by:
  

Prongs, tracks, biscuits, or clips, these attachments are here to stay

by Andy Engel


Who came up with the first hidden decking fastener is open to debate. Weston Leavens remembers first seeing them in a magazine sometime around the end of the Reagan administration. A screw or nail affixed the clip to the first board and to the joist, and the second board was driven onto a prong protruding from the first clip.

At the time, Leavens was the owner of one of the largest deck-building companies in San Diego. Intrigued, he ordered a box of the fasteners and used them to build a display deck for the annual home show. "The deck moved and squeaked," says Leavens. "It was embarrassing. I thought we'd done something wrong, so I called the magazine and eventually got in touch with the author. It happened that the deck featured in the article wasn't far away, so I arranged a visit. Well, it squeaked and moved, too, but the owners didn't seem to mind." That experience led Leavens to invent the Deckmaster, a track system that he began to use in his own business in about 1989.

That was a fertile time for the hidden-fastener industry. Sometime in the early '90s, Harry Eberle was working on a high-end house in Hunterdon County, N.J., and as seems common with busy builders, his mind was in two places at once. While he was using a biscuit joiner to put together the cabinets, he was also noodling out the best way to fasten down the furniture-grade ipe for the deck.

Click here to read full article from Deck Magaziner