First Test: T-Drill T-35 Tee-Forming Tool Rockville Centre NY

A T-Drill is a unique, incredible plumber's tool in Rockville Centre that I've relied on to give me a competitive edge for nearly a decade, yet most people–including many plumbers–have never heard of it. So when I was asked to review the new T-35, I was eager to see what kind of improvements they made to this amazing tool.

Local Companies

Roberts Plywood Co.
800-422-4944
45 North Industry Court
Deer Park, NY
Fastenal- Hicksville
516-942-2640
73 Bloomingdale Rd Hicksville, NY, 11801
Hicksville, NY
CLEARVIEW PAINT & DECOR
(718) 747-5000
20-11 Francis Lewis Blvd
Whitestone, NY
Auburndale Mason Supply
718-357-7889
40-02 Francis Lewis Blvd
Bayside, NY
Kmart 9381 / Cross Merch
(631) 421-5005
839 New York Avenue
Huntington, NY
Monster Woodshop
888-506-6678
607 18th Street
Brooklyn, NY
Suburban Mills
631-351-6445
16 Railroad St
Huntington Station, NY
Botto Brothers Hardware
(516) 931-0816
231 Broadway
Hicksville, NY
Canarsie Lumber, Inc
718-649-2200
826 Rockaway Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
The Home Depot
(718)827-9568
579 Gateway Drive
Brooklyn, NY
Data Provided by:
  

Provided By:

Source: TOOLS OF THE TRADE Magazine
Publication date: September 12, 2007

By Michael Springer

A T-Drill is a unique, incredible plumber's tool that I've relied on to give me a competitive edge for nearly a decade, yet most people–including many plumbers–have never heard of it. So when I was asked to review the new T-35, I was eager to see what kind of improvements they made to this amazing tool.

A T-Drill pulls a tee out of a continuous run of copper tubing. It consists of a drill motor with a high-tech business end that does the holding, drilling, and forming. Here's how it works: support legs at the head of the drill hold it centered on a piece of tubing. With the desired outlet-size T-Drill head attached, a pilot hole is drilled into the tube; then, with the bit still in the tube, two forming pins built into the pilot bit are extended by rotating a collar on the head.

After engaging the reverse-feed mechanism lever, the support legs push against the tubing, and the spinning forming pins back out of the tube, leaving a tee outlet of the proper size. And all of this is done in mere seconds.

Then the branch, or outlet, section of tubing is prepared by placing it in a T-Drill notcher, where it is cut to the sameradius as the tube run so the branch does not project into the run of tube. The notcher also leaves two dimples on the branch. These serve as a depth stop, an alignment guide, and provide for easy inspection of the joint.

Click here to read full article from Tools of the Trade