Fertility in Ovarian Cancer Patients Bronx NY

Saving the uterus or one ovary of a young woman with early-stage ovarian cancer can preserve her fertility without compromising her survival, a new study has found in Bronx. Researchers at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons found that survival rates during the first five years following the cancer diagnosis were similar between women who had one ovary or their uterus spared and those who had a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or both ovaries removed.

Local Companies

Domenick Conte
973-890-5464
718 Riverview Dr. 
Totowa, NJ
Fouad Hanna
(973) 742-6651
661 14th Avenue
Paterson, NJ
Maria Nicolaides
(212) 639-3105
1275 York Ave
New York, NY
Tanya Panton
(718) 933-2400
360 E 193Rd St
Bronx, NY
Biagio Scialpi
(914) 963-0829
330 Park Hill Ave
Yonkers, NY
Edward Jacobson
(203) 869-8353
1 Perryridge Rd
Greenwich, CT
Gary Pepe
(973) 790-8878
83 Long Hill Rd
Little Falls, NJ
Dilip S. Bharne
(212) 666-6600
570 West 125th St
New York, NY
Tatiana Zaslavsky
(718) 548-1212
3871 Sedgwick Ave
Bronx, NY
Doyle Shevaun
(914) 946-1010
222 Westchester Ave # 101
White Plains, NY
Data Provided by:
  

Provided By:

Saving the uterus or one ovary of a young woman with early-stage ovarian cancer can preserve her fertility without compromising her survival, a new study has found.

Researchers at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons found that survival rates during the first five years following the cancer diagnosis were similar between women who had one ovary or their uterus spared and those who had a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or both ovaries removed.

"Given the potential reproductive and non-reproductive benefits of ovarian and uterine preservation, the benefits of conservative surgical management should be considered in young women with ovarian cancer," the authors concluded in their report published in the Sept. 15 issue of Cancer.

A hysterectomy or removal of both ovaries, in addition to ending a woman's reproductive ability, can cause estrogen deprivation that leads to many other health issues, but is often viewed as the best surgical treatment for the cancer, according to information in a news release from Columbia University.

In the study, Dr. Jason Wright and colleagues looked at more than 4,000 ovarian cancer patients, aged 50 or younger, who had surgery for the disease during a six-year period. While only about 400 had an ovary conserved and about 650 had uterine preservation, their survival rates generally matched their counterparts who had the full hysterectomy or ovary removal.

About 17 percent of the more than 21,000 U.S. women diagnosed with ovarian cancer last year were age 40 or younger, the news release noted.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about ovarian cancer.

SOURCE: Columbia University, news release, Aug. 10, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

Related Articles
- Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Bronx NY
Incomplete and interrupted radiation treatment is a common problem among Medicare patients with head and neck cancer, a new study has found. Researchers analyzed data from 5,086 Medicare patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer between 1997 and 2003 and found that nearly 40 percent of them experienced interruptions in radiation therapy or failed to complete the course of therapy.
- Cost of IUI Bronx NY
- Breast Cancer Treatment Bronx NY
- Exercise for Chemotherapy Patients Bronx NY
- Effects of Obesity on Fertility Bronx NY
- Open Prostatectomy Versus Laparoscopic Procedure Bronx NY
- Drug Combo Proves Powerful Against Lung Cancer Bronx NY
- Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Bronx NY
- Delayed Prostate Cancer Therapy Bronx NY
- Prevalent Warning Signs Tied To Brain Tumors Bronx NY